Excerpts from

The Skirt Chronicles' second volume.

 Collage by Freja Nielsen.

Collage by Freja Nielsen.

You shall not be inspired

 

Somehow it’s very confusing. How what is commonly referred as French style became a branded matter? How did an entire demographic become supposedly the bearer of a natural je ne sais quoi whatever you say? When did we shift to an army of wannabe bloggers and why would they wannabe influencers posting non stop pictures of Brigitte Bardot and Jane Birkin on social media? And when did so many women find advise to give on how to look, eat, and act French? It’s confusing because the main reason French style is worshiped seems to be because it’s effortless. But let’s reveal the supercherie once and for all; it does take a lot of effort! French women are not born with the “authenticity” Simone de Beauvoir saw in Brigitte Bardot in her essay “The Lolita Syndrome” first published in August 1959 in Esquire. A myth was born with this concept of effortlessness when really it takes a lot to look natural without evoking the smell of one of our smelliest cheese.

 

Written by HAYDÉE TOUITOU

 
 Joan Juliet Buck with Julie Britt, first day at Glamour magazine in New York City, August 1968.

Joan Juliet Buck with Julie Britt, first day at Glamour magazine in New York City, August 1968.

Joan Juliet Buck

 

If you Google Joan Juliet Buck, the first thing that will come up is “The only American to have edited a French magazine”, but there is more hiding behind this reductive one-liner.

If at the helm of Vogue Paris, she did increase both circulation and advertising revenue, she mainly, to paraphrase Diana Vreeland “gave them something they didn’t know they wanted” and brought her distinct intellectual patina to the frozen Conde Nast title. Instead of the usual guest edited December issue, readers got to spend a day in the life of our brain with Professor Jean-Pierre Changeux and delight in a visual exploration of chaos by photographer Duane Michals. Vogue Paris became a successful fashion publication once again, as well as a magazine in touch with its times, something it hadn’t been since Edmonde Charles-Roux.

 

Written by CHRISTOPHER NIQUET                                                                                                                                                                                                                  

 
 At the foundry where Luna Paiva manufactures her pieces, Buenos Aires, Argentina, June 2017.

At the foundry where Luna Paiva manufactures her pieces, Buenos Aires, Argentina, June 2017.

The moon is illuminated by the sun, an interview with Argentinian sculptor Luna Paiva

 

What led you to the foundry? I found this amazing bronze foundry six years ago, and I met the three brothers who run it. We immediately started working on more than twenty different species of succulents and cacti. They are the fourth generation of founders and have made most of the sculptures that are in public parks, along with most of the monuments in Argentina.

Why did you choose this technique? It is the same lost wax technique sculptor first used during the Bronze Age. I find it extremely attractive because of its material fidelity, the mutability of the medium and the change in temperatures. The fact that it endures over time is also particularly interesting to me. 

 

Written by HAYDÉE TOUITOU   Photographed by MARTIN PISOTTI & LUNA PAIVA

 

 
 Da Isa Pizzeria, Tokyo, Japan, April 2017.

Da Isa Pizzeria, Tokyo, Japan, April 2017.

How deep is your love?

 

The word artisan does not quite capture the totality of dedication and cultural reverence embedded in the Japanese word shokunin. This word represents a person’s full commitment to every detail of their craft, whether they are an author, a musician or a pizzaiolo.

The term pizzaiolo appears for the first time in a document dated August 12th 1799, in which a young pizza chef makes an appeal to the Polizia Generale of Naples, as a result of the prejudices suffered by his trade during the Parthenopoeian Republic.

 

Written and photographed by SOFIA NEBIOLO

 
 Impossible beach to find on a map, Monte Argentario, Italy, May 2017.

Impossible beach to find on a map, Monte Argentario, Italy, May 2017.

Monte Argentario

 

The sea was all around us yet it was nowhere to be found. We followed a sign with the word
mare and an arrow pointing to the right. Emerging from the water, a mermaid that doesn't
like to swim.

Joanne is wearing a J.W Anderson pleated gauze dress, jewels model’s own.

 

Photographs by GILLIAN GARCIA   Styled by SARAH DE MAVALEIX   Model JOANNE BURKE